Exclusive: Chance Kelly Interview

      Email Post       11/29/2008 12:23:00 AM      

We recently had the opportunity to talk with Chance Kelly, who plays rogue FBI Agent Mitchell Loeb on Fringe. Chance was on the set, filming the episode we will see after the break - Bound on January 20th. He discussed what it's like to work on Fringe, and gave some interesting insight into his character - that maybe his character might end up being a good guy, and the reason for shooting Joanne Ostler:
That broad might have had it coming, kidnapping little kids...

Listen Now:






We would like to thank Chase Kelly for his time, and to Jen and Adele of the Fringe Dwellers Podcast (The official podcast of FringeTelevsion!) for conducting and recording this interview for us.

Fringebusters: The Dreamscape

      Email Post       11/26/2008 04:37:00 PM      

Each week, Popular Mechanics brings in experts to analyzes the science of Fringe, and separate the science fact from the science fiction.

For the latest episode of Fringe, "The Dreamscape," their resident brain expert tackles the memory-erasing experiment and fatal hallucinations.

PopularMechanics.com: How Fringe Gets Memory Science Wrong: Hollywood Fact vs. Fiction

Massive Dynamic Shirts

      Email Post       11/26/2008 02:40:00 PM      

Just in time for the Holidays, I've created some Massive Dynamic shirts. Show your support for everyone's favorite multi-national corporation specializing in secret bio-research and defense contracting (and for FringeTelevision).

As a bonus, Spreadshirt is having a sale until Friday: Receive 20% off when you buy 2 products
(USD$: BUYMORE8 / CAD$: CADBUYMORE8), or Receive 25% off when you buy 3 products
(USD$: BUYMORE9 / CAD$: CADBUYMORE9).

Hurry, before Nina Sharp and her goons shut the whole operation down!

Walter's Lab Notes: Fringe 109

      Email Post       11/26/2008 11:08:00 AM      


Walter's Lab Notes from Fringe episode 109 The Dreamscape, features both origami frogs and a real one, a photo of deceased Massive Dynamic employee Mark Young, and the same Synaptic Transfer diagram from the first set of lab notes. In the notes, Walter mentions the bible again (Exodus 8:13), Barbara Striesand's "The Way We Were", William Shakepeare's Macbeth, and of course a reference to Thanksgiving.
- Project 269 - Exploration 19 -

I had not expected the opportunity to return to this project so soon. The resurfacing of Agent Scott - for whatever distress it has caused Agend Dunham - confirms my suspicion that lysergic acid diethylamide can induce flashbacks of alien, as well as indigenous, memories - like the corners of my mind - misty water-colored memories... Curse you Striesand, your wretched lyrics afflict my soul!

How fortunate that Olivia brought these toads here. "And the river shall bring forth frogs abundantly, which shall go up and come into thine house, and into thy bedchamber, and upon thy bed, and into the house of thy servants, and upon thy people, and into thine oven, and into thy kneadingtroughs." And thy laboratories! I have modified the regression formula to include doses of bufotenin and 5-MeO-DMT from the bufo alvarius. Like the Scots witches, I will stir the pot:

Eye of newt, and toe of frog,
Wool of bat, and tongue of dog,
Adder's fork, and blind-worm's sting,
Lizard's leg, and owlet's wing ...

...with oyster crackers on the side, of course. The new brew will assuredly amplify the psychedelic effects, allowing even deeper penetration into repressed memory. Perhaps I should inform Olivia; but she has little patience for such details. The whole process should take four to five hours. Not unlike the time required for baking a turkey - assuming, of course, the bird has been properly thawed and brined. I must remind Astringent not to drain the tank when we are done; no need to waste perfectly good saline solution!

Yet there is but one subject this time. The puzzle is one of recursion: the linking of the brain to itself. What happens when a person goes through her own portal? Herein lies the danger of a strange loop, and endless spiral of meta-realities, each self gazing into a deeper self. The experience could lead to the destruction of identity. Or perhaps its affirmation - for what is self but an endless recursion, looking at oneself in a mirror within a mirror within a mirror...

Fringe Scenemaker 109: The Dreamscape

      Email Post       11/26/2008 09:23:00 AM      


Scenemaker is a behind-the-scenes look at the making of Fringe. This episode shows the making of "When Butterflies Attack".

You can watch previous episode's scenemaker videos here.

Fringe Episode 109: Promotional Photos

      Email Post       11/25/2008 11:29:00 PM      

FRINGE: Broyles (Lance Reddick, L) and Olivia (Anna Torv, R) investigate a death at Massive Dynamic headquarters in the FRINGE episode The DreamscapeHere are the promotional photos for Fringe episode 109 - The Dreamscape.

You can find more promotional photos, episode screencaps, and more in our Fringe Gallery!This Space Intentionally Left BlankFRINGE: Nina Sharp (Blair Brown) is at the center of a mysterious death in the FRINGE episode The DreamscapeFRINGE: Olivia (Anna Torv, L) interrogates Nina Sharp (Blair Brown, R) at Massive Dynamic headquarters in the FRINGE episode The DreamscapeFRINGE: Walter (John Noble, L) and Peter (Joshua Jackson, R) examine a man who fell to his death from the Massive Dynamic building in the FRINGE episode The DreamscapeFRINGE: Walter (John Noble, R) and Astrid (Jaskia Nicole, L) examine a man who fell to his death from the Massive Dynamic building in the FRINGE episode The DreamscapeFRINGE: Walter (John Noble) examines a man who fell to his death from the Massive Dynamic building in the FRINGE episode The DreamscapeFRINGE: Walter (John Noble, R) and Olivia (Anna Torv, L) investigate a death at Massive Dynamic headquarters in the FRINGE episode The DreamscapeFRINGE: Olivia (Anna Torv, L), Walter (John Noble, C) and Peter (Joshua Jackson, R) investigate a death at Massive Dynamic headquarters in the FRINGE episode The DreamscapeFRINGE: Olivia (Anna Torv, L) interrogates Nina Sharp (Blair Brown, R) at Massive Dynamic headquarters in the FRINGE episode The Dreamscape

Fringe Episode 109: The Dreamscape

      Email Post       11/25/2008 07:57:00 PM      


A Massive Dynamic employee is so convinced he is being attacked by butterflies that he jumps out of a window to escape them, and the team is called in to investigate. Although Olivia's unexplained interaction with Agent Scott leads to breaks in the case, she is so desperate to rid her consciousness of him that she demands to go back in the tank. Meanwhile, the jig is up for Peter when a former friend and some current foes find out he's back in Boston.

Fringe Episode 109: The Dreamscape Tonight!

      Email Post       11/25/2008 07:57:00 PM      

On tonight's episode of Fringe "The Dreamscape":
FRINGE: Walter (John Noble) examines a man who fell to his death from the Massive Dynamic building in the FRINGE episode The DreamscapeA Massive Dynamic employee is so convinced he is being attacked by butterflies that he jumps out of a window to escape them, and the team is called in to investigate. Although Olivia's unexplained interaction with Agent Scott leads to breaks in the case, she is so desperate to rid her consciousness of him that she demands to go back in the tank. Meanwhile, the jig is up for Peter when a former friend and some current foes find out he's back in Boston.
Episode discussion takes place over at Episodes.FringeTelevision.com, where you will also be able to share your comments with other Fringe fans. Or, take your fandom to the next level over at Fringepedia, the Fringe Encyclopedia.

Easter Eggs and Screenshots will be posted at EasterEggs.FringeTelevision.com throughout the night. Screencap requests can be made here.

Keep your eye out for The Observer, who makes a cameo appearance in every episode, and for other clues, including the Next Episode Clue. The clue from last week's episode can be found here.

What Would You Ask: Mitchell Loeb?

      Email Post       11/25/2008 02:36:00 PM      


Tomorrow, I'll be talking to Chance Kelly, who plays rogue FBI agent Mitchell Loeb.

He is the guy who wrapped a parasite around his heart to find out where "The Gentleman" lives (Little Hill) in In Which We Meet Mr. Jones, and as seen here, pulled an apple out of safe in The Equation.

If you have anything you would like to ask, leave your questions in the comments, and I'll ask as many as I can.

Fringe Progamming Note

      Email Post       11/25/2008 01:02:00 PM      

The Circuit Presents: On the Fringe host Ajay FryTonight's episode of Fringe, The Dreamscape, will start later than usual (9:08 PM EST) due to House running eight minutes long. Fortunately the episode hasn't been shortened, which means Fringe will run long as well.

In Canada, where Pushing Daisies is the lead-in, Fringe will still be starting late, but to fill the gap, they will be airing an eight-minute special - The Circuit Presents: On the Fringe, hosted by Ajay Fry.

Going forward, next week's episode Safe, will be at the normal time, but sadly will be the last new episode of 2008. (December 9th will be an "encore presentation" of The Ghost Network)

Fringe will return with all new episodes in 2009, starting on January 20th, with the episode Bound. House will be moving to Monday nights, and Fringe's new lead-in will be American Idol.

Fringe: John Noble Conference Call

      Email Post       11/24/2008 10:31:00 AM      

Fox held a conference call last week where a handful of journalist asked John Noble questions about Fringe and his character Dr. Walter Bishop.

On the accent:
John Noble: The character of “Walter,” because of his nature, he’s a top academic. We knew that he was probably born in – well, he was born in England, but he’d spent most of his life in Boston, which has a unique sort of accent anyway, and had lived in this sort of very worldly, peopled with scientists from all over the world, so he kind of lived in a different world and has picked up what we called a Transatlantic accent, so it is American, but it has sort of elements of British in there as well, and that’s the term we use in vocal, talking about vocal stuff is Transatlantic, and we did that quite deliberately because of the background of the character.
On Walter's relationship with Peter:
Julia Diddy (FanCast.com): “Walter” seems to almost be torn in terms of his loyalty to “Peter” and his loyalty to science, as if his experiments are also his children in a sense. ... It seems like there’s a sibling rivalry with “Peter” against science, so I was curious about the process you go through to play that.

John Noble: It’s an amazing observation. It’s true. It’s absolutely true what you say. Given a task, that “Walter” is incredibly focused, myopic when he has a task to do, and really other things become secondary. And we know this with a lot of people in our society are workaholics, and find it difficult to split their time between their work and their families. Now this is an issue that many of us deal with. This is an extreme case of that. And when he’s on his science, he really doesn’t have time for this squawking child next to him or for the wife, and I think there are plenty of examples of that in society, but “Walter’s” is just heightened a little bit.

FringeTelevision.com has an exclusive recording of the entire interview here:







Or, click here to read a transcript of the interview.
J. Noble: Hello, everybody.

Moderator: We’ll go to the first question from Joshua Maloni with Niagara Frontier Publications.

J. Maloni: John, thanks for your time today.

J. Noble: You’re very welcome.

J. Maloni: I have to say, yours is definitely one of the best new characters this season. Watching you last night chewing the gum and calling Jasika, “Asteroid,” I mean it’s just comic genius, I have to say. I’m wondering, how do you approach the parts and how much fun is it to play?

J. Noble: Well, the second part of it, it’s as much fun as it looks like. I mean it’s an absolute hoot playing. It’s obviously got serious aspects to it, but I treat it as a hoot to play the thing. Preparation, well, that’s probably the hardest bit, getting the timing right and doing the preparation on the scientific work. But working on Fringe is a great job. I mean it’s a great group of people to work with, and amazing scripts from the minds of J.J. Abrams and other people. They’re geniuses. Living inside their heads much be a very strange thing to do because they’re always coming up with something different. Overall, fantastic experience, and thank you for the comment about “Walter.”

J. Maloni: Yes. I mean, like you said, J.J., his shows, I mean the storylines are always, you know, they’re incredibly clever, but they’re also complex. And for the audience, at times, it can be a little challenging to follow. As a cast member, do you find it sort of challenging to follow all the sort of twists and turns?

J. Noble: Yes [laughs], absolutely. But I could also say that, as an audience member, I kind of enjoy reading things that make me concentrate or watching things that make me concentrate, and so, you know, that’s what Fringe does. And I watched an episode on Tuesday night, and I was in it, but there were things I missed, and I said, what was that? What did they say there? So I mean it’s fascinating to be watching something that does require concentration.

J. Maloni: Definitely. Thanks, John, for your time.

J. Noble: You’re very welcome. Thank you.

Moderator: Next we have Sarah Jersild with the Tribune Interactive.

S. Jersild: Thanks so much for taking my call.

J. Noble: You’re very welcome, Sarah.

S. Jersild: We were just talking about how “Walter” is this incredibly genial fun character, but he’s got this menace behind him, which we saw when he drugged “Astrid,” when he – we just discovered he was doing experiments on “Peter” as a child. How do you balance that being this sort of cuddly guy when all of a sudden we find out, he’s kind of scary?

J. Noble: Yes. It’s the dark side to stuff, isn’t it? I guess it exists in all of us. But with “Walter,” because of who he is and how he is and how bright he is and how disturbed he is, it just sort of surfaces a bit more often and a bit more radically than it does in most of us. I don’t find it that hard to find. I mean taking each moment when I’m doing a scene, I take each second and look at what’s gone through at that point, and sometimes those reactions just come out, to be honest with you, out of frustration, the character’s frustration, or out his greater purpose, whatever, out of his madness. But it’s certainly interesting to play, and it shocks the people I’m playing with at times. You see these shocked reactions from the other actors, but that all makes some good fun too.

S. Jersild: Great. Thanks so much.

J. Noble: You’re very welcome.

Moderator: We’ll go to David Martindale with the Hearst Newspapers.

D. Martindale: Hello, John.

J. Noble: Hello, David.

D. Martindale: I love the show. You’re really wonderful in it.

J. Noble: Thank you.

D. Martindale : At my softball game this weekend, I think I saw “The Observer” milling around. I was very concerned.

J. Noble: I think he was there.

D. Martindale: Yes. Yes.

J. Noble: Yes. He was supposed to be there.

D. Martindale: Do you have a head for science? Do you have an aptitude for even fundamental science?

J. Noble: Yes, I do, but more on a theoretical level than a practical level. One of my best friends, a fellow who I shared a house with many years and we were at the university together, he’s a brilliant scientist. He’s also quite mad. But we would talk, and my thought was the art, his was the science, but we could talk for hours. We found common ground in the theory, the theoretical side of it, and so I’ve always understood that or being able to talk about it, and also have written quite extensively. But put me in a lab with a whole lot of instruments, and I may not do so well.

D. Martindale: And I’ve heard it said that the line between genius and madman is very, very thin, and “Walter” definitely walks on both sides of that line. Do you find, I mean do you find this friend of yours, for example, some inspiration for that or someone else?

J. Noble: Yes, I certainly do. His name is Dr. Ted Steal, and he’s an extraordinary man, and he’s always ridden on the edge of the scientific community because he’s just absolutely no good at politics, but he’s a genius, and so, but he was a man whatever he did he did with absolute passion and focus and so if we were out drinking and partying, or if he was playing tennis or football or going after a girl, whatever he did, it was with complete and utter focus. That’s one of the aspects that “Walter” has as well. But he was also a lovely man, but he’d also fight people. I mean, at a turn of a hat, he would fight people, and so he was a fascinating guy. In fact, he’s having his 60th birthday this week, I think, and I can’t be there in Australia with him, but he’s an amazing man, and I’ve based a lot of this on him.

D. Martindale: Wow. That’s terrific. Thank you so much. I love the show.

J. Noble: Thanks so much for your comment.

D. Martindale: You bet.

Moderator: We’ll go to Fred Toppel with SciFi.com.

F. Toppel: Hello, John.

J. Noble: Hello, Fred.

F. Toppel: In the upcoming episodes we’re going to see later this month and next, what are some of the great “Walter” moments we’ll see?

J. Noble: In terms of – I guess there are always two things. There are the sort of bleak and dark moments that you see sometimes, and there’s also the comedic, well what play as comedic moments. We’ve just really finished off the final episode that will be going on in December, and there are a lot of “Walter” moments in there just him being inappropriate really.

There are a couple of quite – the next episode, which goes on next week, we see “Walter” from a different angle, very vulnerable. He goes back into the asylum, and we see the very, very fearful man return for a while, although he does have some wonderful moments early in the episode. But when he goes back inside, he turns back into this incredibly fearful, stuttering fellow who we saw when we first met him.

It’s a very interesting journey that we see “Walter” go through. You know, he also solves these extraordinary things either because he had done them in the past or because he simply has the intellect to think now. We’re getting more episodes where “Walter” hasn’t done that experiment sometimes, but he has the mind to be able to see a way through it, so that’s the sort of thrust of things you will expect to see in the future.

Deepening of the relationship with the son, of course. There’ll be a lot more of this. As you go through, you know, this season and the next seasons after that, you’ll see the ensemble of actors interact a lot more than maybe we’ve seen at present. The relationships with the “Olivia” character will become more like relationships do when people who know each other for a while and start to kind of have an investment and care, and care for each other. We certainly will see that in the first episode coming back next year where we all bond together to support “Olivia,” and she for us. So that’s the sort of thing you can look forward to.

F. Toppel: That sounds great. Just as a follow up, do you approach “Walter” with some sort of logic for some of the weird, seemingly random things he says, or do you just go with it?

J. Noble: I think there’s – as an actor, I always have to find a reason. I can’t just sort of say something out of the blue, so I always find some sort of neural pathway in there, some image that it’s tapped. It’s like we are, we’ll see, we’ll smell something or we’ll hear a sound, and it’ll take us into a memory. You know how that happens to you as well? And so it’s like he continually has these little memory jolts that will – but instead of keeping them to himself, he talks about them, and say, “I had a fruit cocktail once in Atlantic City.” And that’ll just come out because it’s a memory, so he’s quite inappropriate at times.

F. Toppel: He’s a fantastic character, so thank you for talking to us about it.

J. Noble: Thanks so much. It’s lovely to talk to you.

Moderator: We’ll go to Marisa Roffman with Zap2it.com

M. Roffman: John, how are you doing today?

J. Noble: How are you doing, Marisa?

M. Roffman: Okay. I’m doing very well. I’m very happy to be talking to you.

J. Noble: Thank you.

M. Roffman: So I have a question because “Walter” has been – he’s obviously very grounded in mythology between “William Bell” and Massive Dynamic. Are we going to see more of that in upcoming episodes at all? Do you know?

J. Noble: There’s going to be a growth in that sort of in the mythology. It’s not going to be laid all out for everyone to find in one episode.

M. Roffman: Right.

J. Noble: Of course, you understand, Marisa, that J.J. won’t do that.

M. Roffman: Of course. No.

J. Noble: And in fact, one of the things that they also do, these people, is that they keep the process pretty organic, and as things happen, as things happen in their mind, this is the writers I’m talking about, or an actor, one of the characters will invent something or a new character will evolve, and they keep it open to evolving the script as they go along. We’re constantly getting rewrites. Sometimes just before we go on set, we’ll get a rewrite because they’ll have a better idea on what line to say there. And so that’s, whilst that’s challenging, it’s also very, as I said, organic. I personally love working that way.

M. Roffman: Okay. Well, thank you so much for your time.

J. Noble: Thank you so much.

M. Roffman: Have a great day.

J. Noble: Bye.

Moderator: We have Troy Rogers with TheDeadbolt.com.

T. Rogers: Hello, John. Thanks for taking the time.

J. Noble: Good day, Troy. How are you?

T. Rogers: Not too bad. Do you have any say over what type of food “Walter” is looking for from episode to episode?

J. Noble: No [laughs], but it’s very funny because this week we had a week where we hadn’t been filming. We’ve been doing a lot of preparation for the next episode, and also sort of ADR and publicity. But I’ve had a chance to have a look at the blogs going on, and there are blogs going around about what “Walter” is going to eat. It’s very funny stuff, and the whole – there was one I tuned into, and it was going for pages and people having such fun just about what “Walter” is going to have to eat next. I think they finally … with a cheese steak, so we’ll see if the writers put it in.

T. Rogers: Yes. A lot of the people think you’re going to eat something sweet….

J. Noble: No [laughs]. Isn’t it funny though? It’s great fun that a television show and a character can get people having so much fun with each other.

T. Rogers: Yes. Exactly. Actually, another follow up, I was just curious what’s the weirdest thing you’ve learned so far working on the show?

J. Noble: Golly. Do you mean within the content of the science?

T. Rogers: Yes. Concerning the cases that you guys….

J. Noble: We’ve got some coming up. A lot of it is – I get more interested in the neural aspects of it, I suppose, than say the parasitical elements of it. When it goes into that sort of neural stuff and it’s a little strange in that sense, I get very excited about it. Obviously the parallel universe episode we did, which was called “The Arrival,” was probably outside of the realm of what we normally think about, although I have to confess, I had a very similar conversation about parallel universes with a friend of mine sitting in the university campus 30 years ago looking at the stars, and so it was an interesting thing to revisit that. You remember what I’m talking about?

T. Rogers: Yes.

J. Noble: So that was kind of memorable for me, that one.

T. Rogers: Okay. Great. Thanks again for your time.

J. Noble: Thank you, sir.

Moderator: We’ll go to Suzanne Lanoue with The TV MegaSite.

S. Lanoue: Hello. Thank you for being here with us.

J. Noble: Thank you, Suzanne.

S. Lanoue: I noticed that you’re speaking voice, your natural speaking voice, is very different from the one you use on the show. And I know you have quite a bit of experience acting and directing and teaching acting and all that. I was wondering, I noticed that the character has a lot of vibrato in the voice, and it almost sounds like – I don’t want to stereotype – I don’t want to say bad – stereotype like the great actor voice. I was wondering how you came up with it.

J. Noble: The character of “Walter,” because of his nature, he’s a top academic. We knew that he was probably born in – well, he was born in England, but he’d spent most of his life in Boston, which has a unique sort of accent anyway, and had lived in this sort of very wordly, peopled with scientists from all over the world, so he kind of lived in a different world and has picked up what we called a Transatlantic accent, so it is American, but it has sort of elements of British in there as well, and that’s the term we use in vocal, talking about vocal stuff is Transatlantic, and we did that quite deliberately because of the background of the character.

S. Lanoue: Did Mr. Abrams help you with that when you say we, or do you mean … coach?

J. Noble: No. I guess that was my job to think about that and come up with something, but it was accepted. I mean, if they hadn’t liked it, they would have told me, I’m sure.

S. Lanoue: All right. Thank you very much. I love Fringe, and it gets better with every episode.

J. Noble: Thank you so much.

Moderator: Next we have Joe Diliberto with Soap Opera Weekly.

J. Diliberto: Hello, John. It’s a pleasure.

J. Noble: Thank you, Joe.

J. Diliberto: I love the relationship on the show between you and your son, your character, that is, and your son. How important is the father/son relationship, and do you expect the dynamic between them to shift or change in any major way, i.e. “Walter” maybe becoming a little more normal?

J. Noble: From my point of view, and I think Josh Jackson will back this up, probably the most, the thing that has held our interest most so far has been that relationship and, in a sense, as individual actors, what we’ve worked on, we’ve probably talked more about that, Josh and I, than about anything else. We just kind of feel that it’s special to do that sort of thing and feel a bit of responsibility to try and get it as right as possible. Judging by the feedback we’re getting, it’s working, and it’s resonating with a whole lot of people.

J. Diliberto: Absolutely. Yes.

J. Noble: And we’ll continue to do that. It’s not going to turn into any sort of soft, “Oh, I understand, and now I know I love you” time, and walk away into the sunset. It won’t happen any more than it happens in families. But they’ll continue to grow. The depth of their relationship will continue to grow. There’s no question about that.

J. Diliberto: Cool. Thank you so much.

J. Noble: You’re very welcome.

Moderator: Our next question is from Rachel Bishop with TheTwoCents.com.

R. Bishop: Hello, John.

J. Noble: Hello, Rachel.

R. Bishop: “Walter” has arguably some of the best dialogue on TV today. You’ve touched on this a little bit, but have you found it difficult or perhaps challenging would be a better word to play a character who not only has very technical, scientific dialog, but also has an extremely non-linear thought process?

J. Noble: No [laughs]. I don’t know what it says about me, but I haven’t actually found it very hard at all [laughs]. I hesitate to give you that answer, but no, I haven’t. I don’t. I find it fun. I don’t know, I’ve always been attracted to that sort of humor anyway, and I guess around our home, I mean all of us use that sort of offbeat humor, so it wasn’t so difficult. And trailing off great lines of what sometimes sound like nonsense also appeals apparently, so I do that occasionally. No, it wasn’t too hard [laughs].

R. Bishop: Good.

J. Noble: Thank you.

R. Bishop: You make it look very easy, so I guess it was easy.

J. Noble: Well, what I’m saying is that I enjoy doing it. It’s not something that I find terribly difficult and have to worry about. I mean it comes certainly naturally, I think.

R. Bishop: Good. Now what have been some of your favorite scenes or moments thus far in the series that we’ve seen?

J. Noble: Yes. Well, anything to do with the cow. Anything to do with the cow, I mean, I adore working with the cow. It just makes – the cow makes me laugh. I don’t know why. Everyone gets all sort of gooey and funny when the cow comes in. And then, of course, I got to milk the cow and, you know, because they rang up and said, “Do you need some coaching to milk a cow?” And I said, “Certainly not. I could milk a cow. I’m a country boy,” so that was great fun milking the cow. I don’t know.

It just – the one where … in the pilot where we’re eating Chinese watching “Sponge Bob,” and that cow was on our necks, myself and Jasika. That was the funniest thing because it was nuzzling up against us trying to get the Chinese food. It wouldn’t stay until I gave it some, but it was just the funniest night doing that scene about 4:00 in the morning. Those sorts of things, there’s a whole lot of them.

One of my favorite games at present is to try and make – I’ve got this thing where I try and make “Broyles” laugh because Lance Reddick plays it to a tee. So I go out of my way whenever I have a scene to try and make him laugh. Of course, as actors, we have great fun with this because, in rehearsals, I succeed. But as soon as the cameras roll, there’s no way. It’s going to be absolute headlines across the nation. “Broyles Smiles” one day.

R. Bishop: That’s great. Well, I really enjoy “Walter,” and I feel like I want to buy him a root beer.

J. Noble: That’s very kind of you.

R. Bishop: Thank you for your time.

J. Noble: Thank you so much.

Moderator: We’ll go back to David Martindale with the Hearst Newspapers.

D. Martindale: I have one more for you. As big and broad as you get to play this character, has it ever happened yet that somebody’s stopped it and said, “John, don’t you think you’re going a little bit big in this scene?”

J. Noble: Sure. Absolutely, David.

D. Martindale: Do they let you bounce off the walls if you want?

J. Noble: No. The agreement that I have with every director that comes in, the term I use is: “I’ll push the edge of the envelope, and then you can pull me wherever you want to.” But I find it easier to go for, you know, “Let me take all the risks, and then tell me what is too much” rather than starting with nothing or starting from very little. I start with a lot, and sometimes they’ll say to me, just pull that one back. It’s no big deal. Or just, you know, change that or just pull the vocal level back there, which I’m more than happy to do, but it means that I have to trust the directors. But I’d rather try for the sort of big effect and then pull it back than start with nothing and try and build it up.

D. Martindale: That’s true. They give Oscars to actors who go big. They don’t often give them to actors that don’t do much.

J. Noble: You have to have a trust in your director. Basically your directors and your editors, you have to say to them, “Well, look, I’ll do this, but don’t hang me up to dry here.” That trust, I mean, I have that with the people I work with. It would be terrible if you thought suddenly that you were being hung out to dry doing this big performance, and it was out of character and out of context, and they kept it in there, making you look like a fool. Then that wouldn’t be so comfortable.

D. Martindale: I get you. Do you ever have “Walter” moments? I mean just where you space out?

J. Noble: Yes [laughs].

D. Martindale: People look at you like you have lobsters crawling out your ears when you do it.

J. Noble: Yes. My daughters do that quite a lot, actually [laughs]…. No, we do. We have a lot of fun of that in nature, but I do have “Walter” moments. My mind goes off onto quite strange places at times, and I’m told, I’m told that this happens.

D. Martindale: It makes sense to you, though.

J. Noble: Absolutely makes sense to me. I’m confused as to why other people just don’t understand.

D. Martindale: I get you. Cool. Thank you so much.

J. Noble: You’re welcome, David.

Moderator: Next is Sarah Jersild with the Tribune Interactive.

S. Jersild: Can you tell me a little bit about the relationship that “Walter” has with “Olivia” and with “Astrid” because the big relationship you have is with “Peter,” but you’re also seeming to get more in-depth relationship with the two women.

J. Noble: Yes. Look. It’s been one of the things that has had to come slowly. We’ve had a man who has obviously been – I don’t think he would have ever been particularly good with women anyway, you know. I think he would have been a pretty horrible husband, not because he’s a bad man, simply because he wouldn’t have thought to be nice. Then he comes out, and he’s confronted with these two girls, and he doesn’t know how to talk to girls, so it’s taken time to learn. He still can’t remember “Astrid’s” name.

S. Jersild: Right.

J. Noble: Which is, I have to say, one of the great joys is working with Jasika on that whole, you know, the name business. She is such a funny girl. I can’t wait to see what they come up with her eventually, but she’s a very, very funny woman. And the one with “Olivia” is fascinating because that’s far deeper. My sense is that “Walter” starts to feel almost paternal towards her. But obviously you can’t go into that path, and just on occasions I can see that “Olivia” wants to ask “Walter” something, but then she’ll back away. We’ve seen a couple times that that’s happened. Somewhere down the track, I think that there will be a coming together of those two, and I don’t know this for a fact, but I just feel it’s inevitable, and I think it’s something that “Walter” and “Olivia” will need to do.

S. Jersild: Right. One of the things you were talking about earlier was there will be a newsflash when “Broyles” smiles. I just found out that he’s actually a jazz musician.

J. Noble: He is [laughs]. He’s a wonderful musician and composer.

S. Jersild: Is there a lot of music on the set or is something like that, and did it surprise the heck out of you when you found out?

J. Noble: It did. When I first met the man, I mean, he’s a very quiet, dignified man. We started to talk, and I suddenly find out that his first degree was in music and he’s, in fact, a composer and a jazz musician, among other things. He’s a man of many parts. But he’s quiet and enigmatic and a very noble man to just spend time with, so I’m very impressed with him, I must say.

S. Jersild: Thanks again.

J. Noble: You’re very welcome.

Moderator: We’ll go to Amy Amatangelo with the Boston Herald.

A. Amatangelo: I joined the call a little late, so I apologize if someone asked this before.

J. Noble: That’s all right, Amy.

A. Amatangelo: I was wondering how much thought you give to the whole idea of “The Pattern” and what is “The Pattern,” and do you have to deal with a lot of people trying to get information out of you, fans of the show thinking you might know something more than they know at this point?

J. Noble: Do you know, we don’t know. I don’t know what The Pattern” is. “Walter” doesn’t, and that kind of works okay for me. We know, and having a global conspiracy of sorts, I mean, goodness me, James Bond opening this week, we’re used to the idea of global conspiracies. I don’t particularly want to know what’s going on in terms of the writers’ minds. As to people asking, well, yes. But it’s not offensively. It’s just, “Do you know anything? And I say, “I don’t know,” and I mean it, so I can’t be drawn really, Amy. But no, a little bit is revealed, and these writers have in mind a plan that could last one, two, three years, or however long it lasts, and they will bring that all to a conclusion at the right time. We can’t reveal everything now because where do you go, so there’s a long way to go.

A. Amatangelo: I actually laughed out loud this week when you called – you were on the phone with “Peter” and you say it’s your father. That whole delivery, I thought, was just so funny in just the way you did it. But I was just curious, is all of that on the page? Is it a lot of rehearsals and back and forth? Is any of it adlibbed on your part to kind of get that … to make a line that really is not that funny, very funny?

J. Noble: What I get is the ink on the page. No, I mean the interpretation of the character is mine. As an actor, I talk an awful lot about rhythms when I’m talking about acting. I don’t want to bore you with this, but that’s what I do, just creating different rhythms within the scene and the act of the scene. See, I did bore you there, but so I mean I’m always looking for rhythms that will work because it makes life interesting rather than just playing through on a flat line the whole time. Lines like that, I don’t know. They just kind of sound right to do it like that.

A. Amatangelo: In the science on the show, we hear a lot when people on medical shows that they have trouble getting the medical jargon down and they have to kind of rehearse. Are there any particular things that you’ve had to – because I feel like your character also often has a lot of the exposition because you’re saying what the science is behind what’s happening? Has there been anything in particular that’s been challenging about that? Half the time, do you even understand what you’re saying…?

J. Noble: Yes. I do what research I can, and I do it off the Internet. So if there’s a chemical described, then I’ll go and see what they’re talking about basically just for my own satisfaction or procedure. The times that it’s more likely to affect me is after we’ve been filming for about 15 hours and we’re onto our tenth take. Then I could start to jumble … it’s really interesting. It doesn’t happen the other way around, you know, at the beginning. It’s after when we start to get tired that things will come out jumbled. But it does take a little bit of work, Amy. Yes.

A. Amatangelo: Great. Thank you so much.

J. Noble: You’re very welcome.

Moderator: Next we have Tara Bennett with SFX.

T. Bennett: Thanks so much for your time today.

J. Noble: You’re welcome.

T. Bennett: One of the things that’s been interesting about your character is that you have had to really kind of do some more of the gory work on the show.

J. Noble: Yes.

T. Bennett: I was wondering if at any time that’s been kind of jarring for you or if there’s ever been a moment when you’ve had to look in a body cavity or something that you’ve kind of gone … even yourself got a little shiver?

J. Noble: No. There hasn’t been. Now I spent quite a long time doing a semi-regular [role] in Australia as a neurosurgeon [on a TV show], so I got to look inside bodies, I’d say, a bit. I was thinking about this yesterday, Tara, in terms of, it looks odd, doesn’t it, to see a man looking inside….

T. Bennett: Sometimes. Yes.

J. Noble: And yet, I thought, “Well, could I do that?” And the answer is yes. But what I would find difficult was when “Walter” can seem to harm or to hurt people and not feel anything. I think that one, but you see we don’t hurt each other, and we don’t hurt the actors that are there and the prosthetics don’t get hurt. I think if there was genuine pain being inflicted, I would feel far less comfortable than I do.

T. Bennett: Thanks so much, and I love your performance.

J. Noble: Thanks.

Moderator: Next we have Julia Diddy with FanCast.com.

J. Diddy: Thank you so much for your time today.

J. Noble: You’re welcome, Julia.

J. Diddy: First, I wanted to know what your own thoughts are about science and scientific advances pushing the envelope, and how does that inform your character?

J. Noble: In my lifetime, you know, lasers were considered to be some sort of futuristic foolish idea. This is in my lifetime, and we use them on a daily basis for everything now. I believe we are only tapping the edges of what is potential … as we learn more through quantum mechanics and string theory, we’re finding out that all sorts of things are possible that we didn’t think were. We’re becoming less ignorant as to the possibilities. We can imagine the impossibilities, as J.J. Abrams likes to say. So I don’t have any problem with any of it, and I just went off on a great big tangent and forgot the question.

J. Diddy: You actually handled it beautifully.

J. Noble: Thank you, Julia.

J. Diddy: In terms about your feelings of science and forming your character. And the only other question, very quickly, you touched upon this a bit already in terms of your character’s relationship with his son. But I’d like to hear just a bit more in terms of “Walter” seems to almost be torn in terms of his loyalty to “Peter” and his loyalty to science, as if his experiments are also his children in a sense.

J. Noble: I think that’s a beautiful observation.

J. Diddy: It seems like there’s a sibling rivalry with “Peter” against science, so I was curious about the process you go through to play that.

J. Noble: It’s an amazing observation. It’s true. It’s absolutely true what you say. Given a task, that “Walter” is incredibly focused, myopic when he has a task to do, and really other things become secondary. And we know this with a lot of people in our society are workaholics, and find it difficult to split their time between their work and their families. Now this is an issue that many of us deal with. This is an extreme case of that. And when he’s on his science, he really doesn’t have time for this squawking child next to him or for the wife, and I think there are plenty of examples of that in society, but “Walter’s” is just heightened a little bit.

J. Diddy: That makes perfect sense. Okay. Thank you so much.

J. Noble: Thank you so much.

Moderator: We’ll go back to Troy Rogers with TheDeadbolt.com

T. Rogers: Actually, following up on that science question, I was wondering what are your personal views on fringe science? Are you into big foot and UFOs and stuff like that?

J. Noble: No, not UFOs. No. I’ve got nothing against them, but it’s just not something that tantalizes my imagination. I think I’m much more fascinated by what we’ve discovered, as I said a while ago, through quantum mechanics and so forth. What was started off by Albert Einstein essentially, who just opened the floodgates into a new world, and then we suddenly find out that we can bend time or the string theory … and it just means that anything is conceivable, and I find that fascinating. We don’t know anything. We don’t know what black holes are even. Do you know what I mean? To me, I get excited by it.

T. Rogers: Yes. So do I because isn’t the theory that we only use 10% of our brains.

J. Noble: Yes. But, you know, we’re moving exponentially. We’re moving so fast that today’s technology is out of place by next week. It’s an exciting time to live in keeping up with these guys. I don’t know. I’m glad to be alive to observe it. I think I’ve lived in an amazing time. I think I’ve lived in amazing times.

T. Rogers: Excellent. Thanks again, John.

J. Noble: You’re very welcome.

Moderator: We’ll go back to Joe Diliberto with the Soap Opera Weekly.

J. Diliberto: Thanks. Hello, again. You were talking about acting before and some of the processes you go through. My question is actually about another actor on the show who is not in it a hell of a lot, but I love her, Blair Brown.

J. Noble: Of course, I know you were going to talk about her.

J. Diliberto: And I was wondering because her character is so kind of diametrically opposite. She’s so focused and everything like that as opposed to yours. Do you think there would ever be any scenes between the two of you?

J. Noble: Absolutely has to be. Absolutely has to be, I mean, apart from the fact that Blair and I want to work together. That’s just a personal thing. But she’s already been interviewed and said, “Yes, Walter and” – what did she say? “Walter and Nina used to be together.” She’s invented this whole scenario. The first time I ever met the woman, when we did a read through the first time, she said, “Well, down the track, I can see that we’ll finish up having a big of go.” She’s a very funny woman. That’s the theory that somewhere down the line, maybe they were even together, which is absolutely feasible, and it’ll be, I’m sure, a very interesting challenge working with Blair Brown. She’s a smashing actress.

J. Diliberto: Yes. Absolutely. That would be so excellent. I hope it happens.

J. Noble: So do I.

J. Diliberto: Thank you.

J. Noble: You’re welcome.

Moderator: Our final question will come from Sarah Jersild.

S. Jersild: Can you tell me a little bit about the experience of actually building the relationship with “Peter” on the show, how you and Joshua Jackson sort of worked between the two of you to make it such an authentic father/son estranged relationship?

J. Noble: We talked. We talked. Joshua and I talked very openly and, frankly, right from the beginning, about this amazing thing. You know, he – we’re both men. I mean, I am a father of a son, and fortunately I have a very good relationship with him. But we understood how complex these things are between men, as indeed they are between women as well. It was something that touched us both and interested us both, and so we became very animated right from the beginning, Josh Jackson and I, about the responsibility of playing this correctly, getting this right. And we still talk about it. We still get excited about it. We’ll go into each other’s caravan and talk about that issue, nothing else but that issue, trying to find the truth in there. And sometimes it’s not clich├ęd sometimes. Sometimes it’s ugly. It’s not what you’d expect, and we’re trying to get all of those elements into it. We take it pretty seriously.

S. Jersild: Great. Thank you so much.

J. Noble: You’re very welcome.

Moderator: We have no further questions in queue. Do you have any closing remarks, Mr. Noble?

J. Noble: Simply this. I mean the people that have been asking questions, thank you for the continued support and the lovely comments you’ve made today. You know, I think the journey of Fringe has only just started. Every energy that I sense around the place is to take this good, very good show, and turn it into a great show. That’s the discussion. That’s the energy that’s going into it, and your support and the way you’ve spoken today obviously you have support of the show, and I thank you for that. It’s going to be a great ride. I think it’s going to be an amazing ride, so thank you so much.

TV Guide: Jasika Nicole Behind The Scenes

      Email Post       11/24/2008 10:24:00 AM      



TV Guide's Infanity went behind the scenes and talked with Jasika Nicole, took a tour of the set, and checked out some the Props used in the show - including The Beacon from The Arrival, and the gas canister and the disk container from The Ghost Network.

Fringe on E!: Josh Jackson Behind The Scenes

      Email Post       11/24/2008 09:41:00 AM      



E! went behind the scenes and talked to Joshua Jackson about last week's Fringe episode "The Equation".

Fringe Fox Fix: Anna Torv Interview

      Email Post       11/24/2008 09:37:00 AM      



Anna Torv talks about her relationships on Fringe.

Fringe Transcripts Now Available On Fringepedia

      Email Post       11/21/2008 09:52:00 AM      

The Fringe Wiki Fringepedia has just added transcripts for all the Fringe episodes, including this week's episode "The Equation".

If there's anything in the show you think you might have misheard or don't understand, the Fringe transcripts may provide some valuable clarification.

For instance, it turns out the man on Flight 627 was from Denver, not Denmark.

Fox Fringe: Walter's Lab Notes 108

      Email Post       11/19/2008 11:48:00 AM      

Walter's Lab Notes from the Fringe episode "The Equation" include red and green Christmas lights, the composite sketch of Joanne Ostler, Ben Stockton's musical composition, and a photo of Dashiell Kim's crime scene. Dr. Bishop talks in his notes about being visited - was he referring to his split personality, or someone else - possibly Dr. Sumner while at St. Claire's?

Click here to read the note.
- Project 577 - Exploration 5 -

It happens all the time: Newton and Leibniz inventing calculus. Darwin and Wallace discovering evolution by natural selection. Jevons, Menger, and Walras elucidating marginalism in economics. And yet, Dashiell and the boy -- with nothing in common -- not even working in the same medium -- not even knowing what they were trying to find --

YOU SHOULD HAVE SOLVED IT YOURSELF! IT IS JUST MATHEMATICS, A SIMPLE MATTER OF CALCULATION, NOTHING MORE.

Every iteration of the main theme of the composition corresponds to a further expansion of the central function in Dashiell's equation. And with each iteration, he comes a step closer to a closed-form solution. Yet the expansion is infinite, implying a potentially endless composition -- small wonder the boy was obsessed --

EXCUSES, EXCUSES TO RETURN TO WHERE YOU KNOW YOU BELONG.

No! I have the boy now, he is the key, on some level he understands, even if he chafes and bristles -

BECAUSE YOU ARE A BURDEN. AND THE VISITOR CAME AGAIN, DIDN'T HE? ALWAYS PRESSURING YOU FOR THE NUMBERS, THE NUMBERS!

I couldn't stop him, he knows my combination. He bumped my head and I went to bed and I couldn't get up til morning --

ENOUGH RHYMES. THE QUESTION IS, WHAT HAPPENED WHEN HE LEFT?

It was still there, my box of secrets, a riddle wrapped in a mystery inside an enigma withing a lumpy mattress. I should have left it there --

FOR THEM TO TAKE? FOOLISHNESS. IS IT SAFE OR NOT?

I have it now. The box is safe, but my secrets are not. My visitor whispered to me: thank you. No more pearls in this oyster, he said.

Joshua Jackson on Bonnie Hunt, Jimmy Kimmel

      Email Post       11/19/2008 07:00:00 AM      

Joshua Jackson was on the Bonnie Hunt Show and the Jimmy Kimmel Live!, talking about Fringe, and his boyhood home (mostly about his boyhood home). One tidbit to come out of these interviews is that he referred to The Observer as September, confirming an early press release with the same name. This doesn't make the name canon in the show, but it is interesting that he would use that name. One explanation is that September could be the internal code name for The Observer.


Bonnie Hunt Show


Jimmy Kimmel Live!

Fringe Scenemaker 108: The Equation

      Email Post       11/19/2008 12:54:00 AM      


Scenemaker is a behind-the-scenes look at the making of Fringe. This episode shows the fight scene between Olivia and "The Attendant".

You can watch previous episode's scenemaker videos here: http://www.fringetelevision.com/search/label/Scenemaker

Fringe Episode 108: Promotional Photos

      Email Post       11/19/2008 12:45:00 AM      

Here are the promotional photos for Fringe episode 108 - "The Equation".

You can see more Fringe photos and episode screenshots in our Fringe Gallery.

FRINGE: Olivia (Anna Torv) tracks a suspect in the FRINGE episode The EquationFRINGE: Olivia (Anna Torv, L) and Broyles (Lance Reddick, R) arrive at a crime scene in the FRINGE episode The Equation
FRINGE: Olivia (Anna Torv, L) and Charlie (Kirk Acevedo, R) investigate a crime scene in the FRINGE episode The Equation
FRINGE: Olivia (Anna Torv) tracks a suspect in the FRINGE episode The Equation
FRINGE: A little boy (guest star Charlie Tahan) holds the clues to the team's mystery in the FRINGE episode The Equation
FRINGE: Olivia (Anna Torv) tracks a suspect in the FRINGE episode The Equation
FRINGE: Walter (John Noble) returns to St. Claire's Hospital in the FRINGE episode The Equation
FRINGE: Walter (John Noble) returns to St. Claire's Hospital in the FRINGE episode The Equation
FRINGE: Walter (John Noble, L) returns to St. Claire's Hospital in the FRINGE episode The Equation
FRINGE: Peter (Joshua Jackson) questions the victim's story in the FRINGE episode The Equation

Fringe Episode 108: The Equation

      Email Post       11/18/2008 09:00:00 PM      


After a young music prodigy (guest star Charlie Tahan) is taken by a serial kidnapper (guest star Gillian Jacobs), it's discovered that a sequence of flashing lights appeared at the abduction, which Walter links back to his bunkmate (guest star Randall Duk Kim) at St. Claire's Hospital. Much to Peter's dismay, Olivia encourages Walter to return to the mental institution, and Walter's determination to help ends up having chilling ramifications in an all-new episode of FRINGE.

The Observer is...

Fringe Episode 108, The Equation, Airs Tonight at 9/8c

      Email Post       11/18/2008 07:15:00 PM      

If you are new to Fringe or just now deciding to truly delve into it, you are in the right place. On Tuesdays we hold a live discussion and easter egg hunt, both starting at 9:00 p.m. Eastern. The article page for tonight's episode of Fringe over at Fringepedia also unlocks at 9/8c.

Before and after Tuesday night, we have news and spoilers, a gallery and a forum. In fact, you could say Fringe Television is an all-inclusive fan site. Yup, you could say that.

But back to tonight's episode. What are you looking for beyond the usual?

Well, you want to keep an eye out for The Observer. He is a cryptic fellow who we don't know much about, but one thing is for sure, he makes an appearance in each episode.

Second thing to watch for is the next episode clue. By the way, the next episode is entitled The Dreamscape. If you want more to go on than that, and don't mind spoilers, see Fringe Spoilers.

Third, any and all reference to Massive Dynamic. Like The Observer, it's all but guaranteed MD is everywhere, including in every episode of Fringe.

While that's it for the solid leads (the stuff we know to look for and why), there are plenty more random curiosities in every episode and this from Jeff Pinkner:

There’s Easter eggs all over the place. Many of them are just for the fun of people who want to play along. Several of them have yet to be discovered.
So you see. It's far from too late to start down the rabbit hole. Happy hunting.

Fringe Dwellers Podcast: Episode 10

      Email Post       11/16/2008 09:02:00 PM      

Jen is back and ready to rumble with Mr. Jones... well, actually with Adele. Your favorite podcasting duo shoot the breeze about the newest Fringe episode, In Which We Meet Mr. Jones.

Listen now:





Show notes are available at the Fringe Dwellers homepage.


You can also subscribe to the podcast on iTunes.

If you have a comment or question for Adele & Jen, you can email them at fringedwellers@gmail.com. You can also leave a voicemail for them at (206) 333-0072, or reach them on Twitter as fringedwellers, or Facebook as Gene the Cow Worshippers.

You can also listen to other Fringe podcasts over at the Fringe Podcast Network.

Fringe Scenemaker 107: In Which We Meet Mr. Jones

      Email Post       11/12/2008 12:18:00 PM      


Scenemaker is a behind-the-scenes look at the making of Fringe. This episode shows the special effects using in shooting the parasite-wrapped-heart operation scene.

You can watch previous episode's scenemaker videos here: http://www.fringetelevision.com/search/label/Scenemaker

What Would You Ask Walter?

      Email Post       11/12/2008 10:44:00 AM      

FOX has scheduled a conference call tomorrow with actor John Noble, better known as Dr. Walter Bishop, to discuss the upcoming all-new episodes of FRINGE and his character’s surprising return to the mental institution!

I've been invited to take part, so if you have any questions you would like me to ask Walter, leave them in the comments, and I will try my best to get them answered.

Fringe Episode 107 - In Which We Meet Mr. Jones

      Email Post       11/11/2008 09:00:00 PM      


Every second counts when a strange, almost-otherworldly parasite mysteriously attaches itself to the internal organs of a dying FBI agent. With a life on the line and strong suspicions of a Pattern connection, Agent Dunham rushes to Germany...

Is the 'mad' in Walter's 'scientist':

Fringe Scenemaker 106: The Cure

      Email Post       11/11/2008 12:31:00 PM      


Scenemaker is a behind-the-scenes look at the making of Fringe. This episode shows the special effects using in shooting the head-exploding diner scene in The Cure.

You can watch previous episode's scenemaker videos here: http://www.fringetelevision.com/search/label/Scenemaker

Fringe Is Back With An All-New Episode Tonight!

      Email Post       11/11/2008 11:11:00 AM      

Fringe Episode 107 "In Which We Meet Mr. Jones" airs tonight, Tuesday, November 11 at 9:01 PM ET/PT on FOX.


For spoilers, synopsis, images and a preview of Episode 7, visit Fringe Spoilers.

For live interaction starting at 9:00 PM Eastern Time join us over at Fringe Episodes for our regular discussion and poll, and the ever popular hunt for clues also starts at 9:00 PM over at Fringe Easter Eggs.

There's even more at Fringepedia, the Fringe Gallery and the Fringe Forum for those of you looking for a new obsession in the post election Internet.

Fringe Nominated for People's Choice Award

      Email Post       11/10/2008 11:46:00 PM      

People's Choice Awards
Go to PCAVote.com
Fringe was nominated for a People's Choice Award under the Favorite New TV Drama category, along with: 90210, Crusoe, Easy Money, Eleventh Hour, Knight Rider, Life On Mars, The Mentalist, My Own Worst Enemy, and Privileged.

I may be a little biased, but looking at that list I think that Fringe is the clear favorite. But as they say, Fringe needs your vote to win. So head on over to PCAvote.com and vote for Fringe. You'll also get the chance to vote on your favorite movies and music too.

BTW, You have until December 7th to vote, and the People's Choice Awards show is on January 7th!

Good luck Fringe!

LA Times: Fringe Q&A with Jeff Pinkner

      Email Post       11/10/2008 04:45:00 PM      

The LA Times Blog has an interview with Jeff Pinkner, the co-executive producer for Fringe, which was just picked up for a full season by Fox. Pinkner discusses how getting picked up for a full season affected the show, hidden Easter eggs, scientific accuracy in the series, and the necessity of exploding heads in a program about science.
Fringe: A Q&A with Jeff Pinkner
Patrick Kevin Day

Q. How did getting picked up for a full season change your planning on the show?

A. If we had only done 13 episodes, I think we all would have been immensely disappointed. The story that we’ve created for this show is a multi-year story. We started by figuring out what the ending was. If we’d only done 13 episodes, I don’t think there would have been a way to satisfyingly move everything up that quickly. The answer is, it doesn’t change our long-term plans, except it allows us to see our long-term plans through.

Q: Did you have a tentative 13th episode ending planned?

A: No, to a degree that would have been planning for failure. And we were all hoping for success.

Q: How many years do you have planned?

A: 75. It will go on longer than any of us. [laughs] No, it’s sort of like an accordian file. There are roads we would love to explore if we have the time. The basic framework I don’t want to say out loud because I think it’s a jinx.

Q: Will the format of Fringe evolve over time the way Lost has?

A: I think of Lost as a show that feels like it's changed, but the change is inevitable. It started on the island, then it went into the island and now it’s about protecting the island. Our show, the basic format will not change as drastically, but it will definitely feel like a deepening and enriching of the story we’re telling.

read more...


Q: The first few episodes of the season seemed a bit repetitive. But the Observer, introduced in the fourth episode, really changed the scope of the show. Was his late introduction intentional?

A: In some ways the show is an experiment for us. We are not, by our own admission, the best at telling stand-alone stories. Because we’re fundamentally attracted to creating worlds, which inherently have an epic scope. While shows like Law & Order are spectacular, it doesn’t have the same epic quality of say, Harry Potter.

It’s our goal to both tell stories, where if you’ve seen nothing before and nothing after, you’ll see a very satisfying 50 minutes of television. But if you have seen what’s come before, you have a whole other level of appreciation.

We set out to populate our world from the start with characters and little mysteries that will only pay off over time. There’s things in the pilot that won’t pay off until Season 3.

I can tell you that there’s almost nothing that’s accidental on the show. There’s no throw-away lines of dialogue, the Observer being in shots is not an accident. There’s Easter eggs all over the place. Many of them are just for the fun of people who want to play along. Several of them have yet to be discovered. But they’re not necessary for the enjoyment of the show. They’re really just for run. If you were to crack the code, it will raise the level of satisfaction, hopefully. For example, in every episode there’s a clue about what the next episode is going to be about.

Q: Can you give a specific example?

A: In the pilot of the show, if you watch carefully in the establishing shot of Massive Dynamic, there’s a sign on the post that’s a little rebus of a pen and a rose. The serial killer’s dad in the second episode is Dr. Penrose. There’s little fun things like that in every episode.

Q: What can you tell us about what we’ll be seeing in the next few weeks?

A: The next episode is a foundational episode, and a lot of things will be set up which will come to pay off over the next several weeks. The next four episodes are stand-alone in quality, but at the same time we start to peel back another layer of the onion. The first six were a prologue, and now we’re getting into the next chapter.

Q: When will the Observer make a major return appearance?

A: He’s laying dormant at the moment. But in the way that pieces come together and interlock, his story is still being told.

Q: Lost has been very secretive regarding its story lines. Do you take secrecy as seriously on Fringe?

A: We don’t have the same level of fanaticism. With Lost, there’s a level of fanaticism that you wouldn’t believe, and so they’re secretive out of necessity. We are definitely protective, and we want the audience to discover the show how we want them to discover it. We definitely try to protect ourselves, but we haven’t found the necessity for the government level of secrecy that Lost has needed to maintain.

Q: Dr. Bishop seems like the most fun character to write.

A: He’s incredibly fun to write. I should say it’s fun to write all of our characters and how they see the world through their prism. I think to write a show solely about Walter Bishop might be a little frustrating. The two main characters, Peter and Olivia, balance him out. I think the three of them provide a very stable triangle for our show. He’s incredibly fun to write for because he can say and do anything, which is a blast for a writer. He’s incredibly brilliant and he’s forgotten just how brilliant he is. He’s scared of his own shadow, and he’s scared of the things he’s done in the past, and he’s incredibly childlike. Which is just really fun to write for.

Q: It seems like it would be easy to go too far with the character. Do the writers have rules for him?

A: I think the rule is you have to bring it back to humanity. It always has to be honest. John Noble, who plays Walter, is unbelievably smart and insisted on finding the humanity in the character. He plays it from a believable place and doesn't play him from a goofball, cuddly cute place. That's our prime directive: Keep it real and honest.

Q: The number of characters being abducted and given extraordinary powers made a lot of sense when someone in a recent episode alluded to the building of an army. Is that what’s going on here?

A: Yes, though I think "army" can be taken more than one way, it's more figurative than literal. But I think the basic premise that there are people who are using our world as a scientific playground is sort of the touchstone.

What scares me is what science is capable of and what we know government and private individuals are experimenting with and toying with in the name of science and the spirit of pure curiosity. Science has the capability of rocking the foundation of what we consider to be reality right now. There was a very real fear among very smart scientists when they fired up the Hadron supercollider that our universe would disappear. I suppose none of us would have known it; we just would have been gone. But these aren’t things to be taken lightly.

Our world, as we’ve seen with the recent financial collapse, is controlled largely by private industry, which does not have the same regulations as government. And when you have unfettered imagination married to technological resources we’ve never had before, plus money, it can become quite scary.

Literally everything we’ve done on our show is grounded in actual scientific fact. We’ve trying to tell entertaining stories. We have the license to get a little crazy, but it’s all grounded in fact.

Q: How much scientific fact is present in any episode?

A: In the last episode, "Bellini’s lymphocemia" was a made-up name, though the qualities of the disease are real. We just didn’t want to imply that individuals working on their own could cure it. We didn’t want to be irresponsible to people with the real disease.

Q: Do you always feel that outside pressure?

A: There’s always a degree of responsibility we feel, but all of our science is grounded in reality. We’re not telling any stories that are in the world of potential.

Q: If you’re playing with the reality anyway, why rely on scientific fact at all? Couldn’t you just completely make something up that sounds plausible and go with that?

A: Yes. But our rule is we don’t want to do it if it’s totally made up. I’m sure people would tell you everything we’re doing is totally unbelievable, but for us, if we set out to do an utterly fictional show, it would probably be easier in some ways, but it would be less exciting. I think we all quite like the idea that we’re working in the realm of the real, as opposed to the entirely made-up. Again, it’s not necessary to watch the show and see how it’s ripped from the headlines, because it’s not. But there’s a certain quality of authenticity that it’s much easier to create if you know the parameters.

Q: The show’s more graphic than anything we’ve seen on network TV in a while.

A: I think we always want to have a quality of “Oh, my God, can you believe what they did on Fringe last night?” When I was a kid growing up, one my best friends’ dads was an ophthamologist, and at their house he had films of all of his surgeries. All of his surgeries were locked-down camera close-ups of eyeballs with scalpels cutting into them and peeling back the corneas. And they’d be running all the time. It was very real and honest — they were created for the purpose of education. Science is kind of disgusting. The human body is kind of disgusting when you look at it inside out, and our show needs to acknowledge that.

Q: Have you encounted any censor problems with things like expoding heads?

A: No. There’s been one or two shots they’ve asked us to trim back, but I think they do far more upsetting things on 24. Not to say that 24 is mean-spirited, but none of our stories involve torture. It’s all very organic.

Q: How’s the experiment with Fringe having limited commercials going?

A: We’re doing an extra act of television every week. Storytelling-wise, we’ve gotten used to it. It’s fanastic when storytellers are given an extra seven minutes of time, but it’s been hard. It’s impossible on prodouction. We’re doing an extra 20% of television every week. We don’t have 20% extra money and time. We’re getting comfortable with the pace of our production. But the writing is challenging, because with those seven minutes we’re still trying to keep the story energy up, and it’s a very fine line between going deeper with the story and keeping it moving.
 

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